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Public Health: Three Ways of Searching

I. OneSearch

OneSearch allows you to search not only CUNY's catalog, but also journal articles and digital collections. In a nutshell, it searches everything.


*OneSearch requires a double login: the first login is with your Barcode - located on the back of your SPH ID card and starting with the numbers 27674. (Some results are suppressed when searching off-campus and you're not logged in). The second login is when you click on Full text available within your OneSearch results; you will use the login credentials as noted in this LibGuide's homepage.   


II. Databases

Boolean Searches

Phrases, Truncation, AND, OR, and NOT

Boolean Operator Example

Phrases: 

Use quotation marks (" ") around any phrase that you want to search as an exact phrase. 

 

typing "anterior cruciate ligament" will search for anterior cruciate ligament as a phrase, not just the individual words anteriorcruciate and ligament

Truncation: 

Search for all terms of the phrase using the stem followed by an asterisk (*).

 

psychology 

All of the following search terms might be useful: psychologypsychologistpsychologistspsychological. All these words have the stem psycholog

In this case, you would type psycholog* 

AND and OR:

You can use AND to narrow your search.

You can use OR to broaden your search.

 

psycholog* AND prison (this search query is more specific, narrower than just using prison by itself)

psycholog* OR prison (this search would produce a wider set of results)

NOT:

Using NOT will indicate what you want omitted from the search.

 

if you're researching marsupials, but not kangaroos, then you enter: marsupials NOT kangaroos

Combining AND, OR, and NOT:

If you need to use multiple Boolean search operators, use parantheses ( ), or separate search boxes to cluster the terms. 

 

dogs AND (cats OR kittens) (You're placing synonyms, using OR, within parantheses.)


 

Research Examples:

1) Let's say you're researching the psychological effects of prison 

    You would type in: 

          psycholog* AND (prison* OR incarcerat*) 

    Noteincarcerat* would search for incarcerationincarcerate and the plural forms of said phrases. 

 

2) Another search topic could be income inequality and education in New York City

    You could search for: 

          income inequality AND (education OR college OR higher education) AND (New York City OR NYC)

    Note: you can see the [possible] difference in results if you put income inequality in quotations.